Lager losing it's bubbles

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Hi all,

I have a problem with lagers losing their bubbles in the glass and have been told that it is to do with the glasswash detergent I use. Apparently, it is due to a build of silicone that is causing the problem. Is there a recommended glasswash you guys could suggest or is it a case of using Renovate every so often??
Many thanks

Andy

9 COMMENTS

  1. Have you tried this

    http://www.inndoctor.co.uk/hygiene/test-your-beer-glasses/

    When you hold the glass up to the light can you see a bloom. You should renovate glass every three of four weeks.

    What product is it do you have the right glasses as in this post

    http://www.inndoctor.co.uk/equipment/flat-carling-which-are-the-right-glasses/

    There is also this post

    http://www.inndoctor.co.uk/cgi-bin/forum/Blah.pl/Blah.pl?m-1295709120/s-new/#num33

    You will have to be very specific and describe your exact problem.

  2. Thanks Maverick.

    The product is Carlsberg served in a Carlsberg glass – glasses have no bloom that I can see and certainly look clean as far as I can see.

    I also sell Amstel on draught but I use a normal sleeve glass for this (as I have no branded glasses for Amstel) and I get the same problem.

    I have only noticed this happening recently but must admit, I have not used Renovate lately. Perhaps I have answered my own question!

    Would still be interested to know if this whole silicone thing is a load of clap-trap and which glasswash people tend to use.

    Andy

  3. Hi Andy

    Just back to basics a little bit, does the lager taste flat, does it pour alright and then goes flat or it pours flat. I call a bloom something like a bluey tinge on the glass usually from the rinse aid. I’m not sure where you would get silicon from unless you polish your glasses with something like a furniture polish. At this moment in time I would look to the glasses themselves have you started using a new batch, I have had faulty etchings on the bottom before now. Carlsberg is a bottom fermented lager and as such isn’t as fizzy as other lagers and so rely s on the glasses to give it it’s head. Are we getting somewhere ?

  4. Maverick,

    The Carlsberg doesn’t taste flat but the bubbles disappear after about 5-10 minutes of being poured. The Amstel however is worse in that the glasses are not etched at the bottom at all and the lager just looks dead almost instantly. I did call my own cellar service guys out to check that the beer was OK – he placed a desert spoon in a pint of dead looking Amstel which was instantly covered in bubbles! He concluded from this that the lager was fine and that the glassware was the problem with a potentially ‘silicone’ based glasswash. (Don’t think Mr Pledge is mentioned on the label!)

    No new glasses recently so am thinking that it could be the residue of the detergent I’m using. The name of some good quality ones would certainly be useful as I suspect that as mine is a local supplier’s own make, it may not be high on the quality front.

    Andy

  5. Sadly due to the way lagers are marketed we all now expect huge frothy heads and co2 bubbling like a boiling kettle. Brewers have designed some of their products to meet these criteria successfully, others have resisted and although their products are of high quality, Carlsberg is one these, they do not always meet the high bubble super head characteristics of some other brands.
    This is a difficult problem, particularly when Joe Public drinks with his or her eyes. I think Mavewrick is pointing you in the correct direction.

  6. Many thanks for the responses – I will use Renovate more often and monitor the results as well as changing the glasswash

  7. 4 wrote: Sadly due to the way lagers are marketed we all now expect huge frothy heads and co2 bubbling like a boiling kettle. Brewers have designed some of their products to meet these criteria successfully, others have resisted and although their products are of high quality, Carlsberg is one these, they do not always meet the high bubble super head characteristics of some other brands.
    This is a difficult problem, particularly when Joe Public drinks with his or her eyes. I think Mavewrick is pointing you in the correct direction.

    Take the Beck’s Vier glass for example, volcano like eruption of bubbles when presented, five minutes later it’s gently fizzing. Laser etchings exhaust co2 in lager and that would be particularly evident in Carslberg, bottom fermented as it is.

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