Separate pumps for separate beers

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handpulI currently work in a pub that sells 3 different ales we only ever have 2 on at any one time however we have 3 pumps in the bar.

Recently there have been arguments about keeping the beer on separate lines (each beer on its own pump) however the manager of the pub thinks that the beer line is clean once water is put though the unused pump and therefore any of the other beers can go onto this pump straight away.

He then repeats this process throughout the week. my argument is that by doing this he risks cross-contamination within the lines who is right me or him??

3 COMMENTS

  1. G’day rimesey,

    When Pat and Biz had The Gamecock (if you knew it you know it) he used to run 3 real ales on a 4 line engine.The spare line was ritually line cleaned as it became available.If the barrel emptied during a session the new one would be coupled up to the clean line,pulled through,the pump clip moved over and Robert was ones Uncle or a suitably close relative.It was not uncommon for the newly released line to be cleaned during a session in anticipation of another barrel being emptied.
    That was 20 odd years ago.

    Nowadays I drag Henry around the boozer round the corner several mornings a week,where they have one line to a single handpull for a guest ale.If the firkin is emptied during a session the usual procedure is to flush through with water and then draw up the new ale.Regular line cleaning is the norm (as it should be) but a quick lineful of water should defer any issues with the taste.

    It works for me,hope I’m not totally wrong (as per usual according to the gaffer).

    Good luck,good ale.Alex.

  2. rimesey wrote: I currently work in a pub that sells 3 different ales we only ever have 2 on at any one time however we have 3 pumps in the bar. Recently there have been arguments about keeping the beer on seperate lines (each beer on its own pump) however the manager of the pub thinks that the beer line is clean once water is put though the unused pump and therefore any of the other beers can go onto this pump straight away. He then repeats this process throughout the week. my argument is that by doing this he risks cross-contamination within the lines who is right me or him??

    This is good question and I would, for one agree with you. They used to tell us bacteria doubles in cask ales when on sale, every thirty something minutes, this is ok when in the hundreds and thousands, but it becomes a problem when it reaches the hundreds of thousands and millions that is why cask ale can sometimes go off in mid session for no reason. However when you mix the yeast from one brew with that of another you get something called wild yeast and then this happens a lot faster. So really it is bad enough mixing the yeast from same brew without mixing different brews.

    Tall Alex wrote: G’day rimesey,

    When Pat and Biz had The Gamecock (if you knew it you know it) he used to run 3 real ales on a 4 line engine.The spare line was ritually line cleaned as it became available.If the barrel emptied during a session the new one would be coupled up to the clean line,pulled through,the pump clip moved over and Robert was ones Uncle or a suitably close relative.It was not uncommon for the newly released line to be cleaned during a session in anticipation of another barrel being emptied.
    That was 20 odd years ago.

    This would be absolutely the best way.

    Tall Alex wrote:
    Nowadays I drag Henry around the boozer round the corner several mornings a week,where they have one line to a single handpull for a guest ale.If the firkin is emptied during a session the usual procedure is to flush through with water and then draw up the new ale.Regular line cleaning is the norm (as it should be) but a quick lineful of water should defer any issues with the taste.

    It works for me,hope I’m not totally wrong (as per usual according to the gaffer).

    Good luck,good ale.Alex.

    This is what I would call being in the real world and as long as you clean the lines once a week and sell the cask fast enough you should be ok. Be interesting to hear other views on this. 😮

  3. For no reason at all other than it just went through my mind;Divide and Conquer is what bacteria do.

    Divide and Concur…Oh,that’ll be us then…

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