end of service procedures

4
1,430 views

Hi all, i have always been led to believe that it is good practice to turn gas off and uncouple the keg dispense head from the keg when not in use i.e. end of night….for several reasons…split pipe, gas soaked beer, theft etc etc

can anyone/all confirm…is there a doc/website that evidences this…..gallon of beer in it for me if i can prove it

thanks in advance 🙂

4 COMMENTS

  1. 335 wrote: Hi all, i have always been led to believe that it is good practice to turn gas off and uncouple the keg dispense head from the keg when not in use i.e. end of night….for several reasons…split pipe, gas soaked beer, theft etc etc

    can anyone/all confirm…is there a doc/website that evidences this…..gallon of beer in it for me if i can prove it

    thanks in advance 🙂

    Yes it is good practice to turn off gas at the end of each session, yes for the reasons you have mentioned: but primarily and especially Co2 on slow moving products usually premium lagers; the gas will absorb into the liquid and increase the top pressure in the container. This will cause excessive fobbing and wastage, also this will happen quicker in colder cellars. Must be worth a pint for that? 8)

  2. Turning the gas off between sessions is good practice. As in each keg the gas is used for two distinct purposes’ firstly the product has a gas content this needs to be kept in equilibrium ie to stop the product going flat or over carbonated. the rest of the gas is used to push the product out of the container either to the tap or to a pump that then pushes it to the tap. This is the part the causes the problems. If the gas is left on then the product absorbs some of this gas so there is less pressure to push it to the tap/pump. Sorry to contradict Maverick, but the top pressure will stay the same, this is set by the valve on the wall. But you are using less of it to push it from the keg. As to removing the connector from the keg, this is bad practice because when you do this air is introduced into the line (remember the small amount that runs around the keg rim) This will travel with the product and more than lightly exit the tap mid pour causing it to spurt and introducing fob into the glass. Multiply this by the taps you have then it could cost a lot of wasted product. This may be required if you do have a theft problem, but don’t think turning the gas off will stop theft. You will be suprised how much beer can be pushed out just with the gas left in the keg.
    Sorry that was long winded but as a gallon of beer was at stake you need as much amo. as you can get.

Do you have a better answer? Leave a reply or an opinion

WordPress spam blocked by CleanTalk.