Turning off Remote and Flash Coolers

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I recently had a problem with my remote cooler, the thermostat had stuck and the ice bank had become so big it stopped the water flowing through the python. After fixing the problem the tech services guy recomended turning off the cooler that night to reduce the ice still in the cooler, this I did and all is now well but the incident has raised a question….
Would it save money (my electric bill is ridiculous) to turn off all coolers at night? it took about an hour for the remote cooler to get down to temperature and this is about the same for the flash coolers, I understand the principle of the claim that it is false economy but has anyone put it to the test?

17 COMMENTS

  1. Our old flash cooler ate electric cos it was rubbish, the new one we’ve got seems a lot more economical. Ask the brewery for a new one.

  2. Thanks for that Nowey; No doubt my remote cooler was eating electric whilst it was all iced up and is going to be far more efficient now and my flash coolers are all relatively new – The techs I have are very good and the equipment is in good nick…. The question really is, has anyone tried testing the theory that it is false economy to turn coolers off during closed hours?

  3. They always used to tell us that coolers should be left on because the savings would be minimal because the compressor would play catch up when switched on to replace the ice, you could always get a timer to switch it off at night and cut in an hour before use. Or there is this, maybe it could be just a marketing ploy savings would depend how good the thermostat is, some coolers have one inch of ice while others have three. So it would be the luck of the draw and how the thermostat is set.

    http://www.innserveltd.co.uk/innenergy

    If you get one let us know if it works and if it does save you money.

  4. I would try using a decent timer. making sure it is rated up to about 10 amps. That is all the innserve device is. Either that or get your electrician to put your remote coolers on to their own circuit with a remote isolating switch handy.
    Switching off your remote over night may cause you problems of ullage. The beer in your pyhtons may warm up and fob.Thing is to give it a go.

  5. 4 wrote: I would try using a decent timer. making sure it is rated up to about 10 amps. That is all the innserve device is. Either that or get your electrician to put your remote coolers on to their own circuit with a remote isolating switch handy.
    Switching off your remote over night may cause you problems of ullage. The beer in your pyhtons may warm up and fob.Thing is to give it a go.

    No it is more than a timer it says……"intelligent power socket for your beer and soft drinks coolers and ice makers. It "learns" from the power usage of the cooler and reduces consumption whilst maintaining performance." 😉

  6. 8 wrote: They always used to tell us that coolers should be left on because the savings would be minimal because the compressor would play catch up when switched on to replace the ice, you could always get a timer to switch it off at night and cut in an hour before use. Or there is this, maybe it could be just a marketing ploy savings would depend how good the thermostat is, some coolers have one inch of ice while others have three. So it would be the luck of the draw and how the thermostat is set.

    http://www.innserveltd.co.uk/innenergy

    If you get one let us know if it works and if it does save you money.

    Thanks for that, I have ordered one, I like the fact it turns on intermittently to keep the beer cold in the python. with my electric bill soaring I have to try something….

    I may still turn off the flash coolers as well, perhaps with timers, will try this first though and see how it goes.

    Thanks again

  7. i know of pubs /clubs that DO turn off the remote and flash coolers over night, you will lose a bit of the ice bank but not enough to make any differance , as long as you turn them on again .flash coolers turn on about an hour before serving. and remotes about the same time.
    pumpcleaner.

  8. i monitored the electric on both my python and flash cooler they both use very little when the ice banks are full approx 800 watts each. I then switched both off at night 1.00am and switched back on at 4.00pm the following day.Allthough i saved some small amount of money on electric i lost more money with my customers complaining about warm lager and a small amount of fobbing .At present i switch my python off at night but keep my flash cooler on.be carefull!

  9. 277 wrote: i monitored the electric on both my python and flash cooler they both use very little when the ice banks are full approx 800 watts each. I then switched both off at night 1.00am and switched back on at 4.00pm the following day.Allthough i saved some small amount of money on electric i lost more money with my customers complaining about warm lager and a small amount of fobbing .At present i switch my python off at night but keep my flash cooler on.be carefull!

    I will have to learn more about this subject fed up of trying to gauge it by looking at the wheel turning at the meter. I would understand better if you could put it in cost savings. I suppose it would take a long time for the beer in the pythons to cool down again once it had warmed up. Would take a lot longer than an hour if you have a few pints in the lines and a long python.

  10. hi beer belly.
    this is where peope get it wrong. at one end .the sellar you have the remote cooler .on the bar the flash cooler.in between you have the python.its ONLY the remote and flash cooler that cools. thats why your pipes are/should be laged. you can turn off the remote and NOT loose much of the ice bank .but if beer is not going through your pipes to the bar even for one/two days/nights the beer in pipes willcool down a little.but even then there should not be any trouble as there is a water re circ in the center of the python. from the remote to the font on the bar all fonts dont have water going through them .but if for instance you have tee bars .they do.
    pumpcleaner

  11. For what it is worth I would leave all coolers switched on. Rather like electric cars there seems to be a simplistic approach to energy savings. It seems logical to switch coolers off that are not in deemand, but realistically the cost savings in electrical power versus waste and under cooled beer at the start of trading sessions is not proven.
    If your beer system is up to date well looked after and cellar cooling in place, then speaking with the benefit of many years experience of labour /money saving schemes in the dispensing trade and what they promise, I would leave well alone, and look for more common sense ways of cutting costs. Check out our site.

  12. never a truer word said boz. as you know there is all ways someone having a bright idea on ways to save money. if all your equipment is set up right .lines cleaned every week. beer in date. WHATS TO GO WRONG. its up to each landlord. if you think it will save you something then there is nothing anyone can do to change there mind. most of the brewers have been at the game for years. if they dont know WHO DOSE.
    pumpcleaner

  13. The InnEnergy device from Innserve works. It is not a timer, it is a power monitor which can detect when the cooler has a full icebank and therefore will not run the cooler when it is not needed. You plug it in for the first 7 days and it will learn the account profile. By this I mean each cooler is defferent and each python run and volume sold is defferent. After 7 days it will switch into energy saving mode and turn off the cooler overnight if you are not using it. Approximate savings are £150 per year it depends on the system but the device does display in pounds and pence how much it has saved. If this is not enough for you then dont buy one.

    Dont use a timer as if you turn the cooler off for 8 hours then the beer in the python will warm up and the CO2 in the beer will come out causing it to fob. This beer wastage will more than offset the savings. The InnEnergy has a built in python refresh which will turn on the cooler pump to cool the python at set periods while the cooler is off.

    You may be asking how I know this , Well I work for Innserve and we have sold over 8500 units into trade. In a time where pubs are shutting anything that can saffely save money without affecting the quality is worth a go. Just as the pub how much they spend on electricity each year.

  14. Hi,

    Good question – I repair these coolers on a day to day basis in our Preston factory. The larger vision remotes with the 34cc compressors can pull upto 8 Amps when running, the smaller 21cc compressors used in the IMI Polarflows & Classic 1000 remotes can pull about 4.5 to 5 Amps while running.

    The normal icebank build time with tap water at 10.c takes the remote 3.4 to 4.8 hours to build a full ice bank with a water temperature of -2.c. The only way that the remote can build the ice quicker is the water temperature is already low.

    If you leave the remote on the only thing that will actually be useing power during the night is the python pump. The remote will take several hours to melt down enough of its icebank to get the dif on the ice stat to start the compressor back up again.

    So to turn the remote off will make no differance at all. We test approx 45 to 50 remote coolers a day and trust me we have tried ways to cut down the costs of running the machines and the best we have found is to allow the cooler to build a bigger ice bank by setting the stat tube further away from the evap coils.

    The compressor runs for a little longer but the size differance with the icebank allows the compressor to be unused for longer periods of time.

    Normally on a busy weekend night the cooler may melt the ice bank 3 times abd be pretty much running non stop to keep up. We have found building a bigger icebank can allow the remote to only run the once for about 2 hours and it keeps up for the rest of the night.

    Over 12 months it really does make a difference.

  15. 421 wrote: Hi,

    Good question – I repair these coolers on a day to day basis in our Preston factory. The larger vision remotes with the 34cc compressors can pull upto 8 Amps when running, the smaller 21cc compressors used in the IMI Polarflows & Classic 1000 remotes can pull about 4.5 to 5 Amps while running.

    The normal icebank build time with tap water at 10.c takes the remote 3.4 to 4.8 hours to build a full ice bank with a water temperature of -2.c. The only way that the remote can build the ice quicker is the water temperature is already low.

    If you leave the remote on the only thing that will actually be useing power during the night is the python pump. The remote will take several hours to melt down enough of its icebank to get the dif on the ice stat to start the compressor back up again.

    So to turn the remote off will make no differance at all. We test approx 45 to 50 remote coolers a day and trust me we have tried ways to cut down the costs of running the machines and the best we have found is to allow the cooler to build a bigger ice bank by setting the stat tube further away from the evap coils.

    The compressor runs for a little longer but the size differance with the icebank allows the compressor to be unused for longer periods of time.

    Normally on a busy weekend night the cooler may melt the ice bank 3 times abd be pretty much running non stop to keep up. We have found building a bigger icebank can allow the remote to only run the once for about 2 hours and it keeps up for the rest of the night.

    Over 12 months it really does make a difference.

    Thanks for that fobmaster nice to hear from someone who has done some research on the subject. I have always believed that to be the case. Also to turn off the top pump would warm up the python anyway(depending on the length of course and bring even more problems) so what you would gain in one way you would lose in another. So I can’t see how these so called, new innovations work any way. Perhaps with the pubs being so quiet these days, perhaps we should go back to the bad ole days when you squeezed 14 lines onto a remote. Then you would really save some money by just having one python system instead of two. Hope no-one is reading this.

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