Warm water line clean.

3
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G’day Chums,

I’m seeking opinions and gen with this one.

One of my regular venues,the one that used to have the problem with candlewax in the carpet,has been shut for refurbishment and major structural work for the last 3 weeks.

With the cellar system shut down and lines in water,coolers turned off and everything I took advantage of the situation and performed a line clean with hot tap water,remembering to use cold water to finish so as not to break anything.

Non indicator Protinate was used so that I could see any resultant debris at a concentration of 1/2 a pint of goop to 1 gallon of water,twice my usual thrutch.Making a job of it you understand.

I was rewarded with precisely nothing in the way of crud and not even a cloudiness of solution or cleansing water as drawn off.

I should mention that I was operating an uncooled handpull system and a remote cooled top pressure system with a couple of Extra Cold coolers thrown in for good measure.

Having roundly patted myself on the back for a job well done I’m a little unsure that I’ve made a good result.

I have since picked the brains of a chap I talk to frequently who is now retired but used to be a tech for Scottish and Newcastle.His opinion is that a Caustic Soda based cleaner is more effective cold than it is hot.

His other advice was to pull water through every week or so to prevent tainting the line,which I’m doing anyway as water soon goes stagnant.

What does the team think?

3 COMMENTS

  1. 179 wrote: G’day Chums,

    I’m seeking opinions and gen with this one.

    One of my regular venues,the one that used to have the problem with candlewax in the carpet,has been shut for refurbishment and major structural work for the last 3 weeks.

    With the cellar system shut down and lines in water,coolers turned off and everything I took advantage of the situation and performed a line clean with hot tap water,remembering to use cold water to finish so as not to break anything.

    Non indicator Protinate was used so that I could see any resultant debris at a concentration of 1/2 a pint of goop to 1 gallon of water,twice my usual thrutch.Making a job of it you understand.

    I was rewarded with precisely nothing in the way of crud and not even a cloudiness of solution or cleansing water as drawn off.

    I should mention that I was operating an uncooled handpull system and a remote cooled top pressure system with a couple of Extra Cold coolers thrown in for good measure.

    Having roundly patted myself on the back for a job well done I’m a little unsure that I’ve made a good result.

    I have since picked the brains of a chap I talk to frequently who is now retired but used to be a tech for Scottish and Newcastle.His opinion is that a Caustic Soda based cleaner is more effective cold than it is hot.

    His other advice was to pull water through every week or so to prevent tainting the line,which I’m doing anyway as water soon goes stagnant.

    What does the team think?

    Hi Tall Alex Happy New Year, at a guess I would think your lines would now be spotless and didn’t have a chance to show cloudy, I use Protinate; so as well as using hot water you are using about five times the required amount of cleaner. Hope you didn’t leave it in too long. I use warm water cleaning out cask ales. But you have to be careful with keg lines hot water freezes quicker (like in a car radiator) and you might end up having to switch off the remote till it thaws. I would agree with you to flush out once a week, there is nothing worse than the smell and taste of stagnant water, though there is a product called guardian that you can put in the line, but I don’t think you can beat flushing through with water.

  2. so as well as using hot water you are using about five times the required amount of cleaner.

    For my sins I tend to go with the Pipeline recommended concentration of 1/2 a pint of goop to 2 gallons of water.
    Pipeline is a Potassium Hydroxide based fluid rather than Protinate’s Sodium Hydroxide base.I’m not sure of the chemistry involved with this one but I do remember watching a tiny crumb of Sodium fizzing around in a bowl of water at school and the video of a tiny fing of Potassium being dropped into a bowl of water and going BANG!.
    From the point of view of drain clearing I can fully vouch for the efficacy of Caustic Soda.

    Hope you didn’t leave it in too long.

    The rule is 30 minutes.I have been told that too long can cause delamination of the inside of the line.To the layman this means that the Micron thickness Food Grade frictionless coating on the inside of the line is destroyed by the caustic action of the solution used.
    I’ll stick to 30 minutes,even though the python is,to my understanding,at least 20 years old.

    But you have to be careful with keg lines hot water freezes quicker (like in a car radiator)

    I’m aware of the idea of hot water freezing more rapidly than cold water on a frosty car windscreen,though I’ve never had the opportunity to measure it (I’m an underpriviledged sort of anorak).

    I would like to know if this has something to do with the momentum created by falling temparature.The higher the starting temparature the greater the fall,the faster it goes,the sooner it freezes.

    Coolers are still turned off,so no snags in the offing on that count thankfully.

  3. I was just going by the instructions on the container there is usually a cup that comes with the box. It’s a 1% volume mix which means it would be 1 Litre of cleaning fluid per 100 litres water as the cleaning containers are about 45 or 50 Litres that would mean about 1/2 Litre each full container.

    Says on my container shouldn’t leave the lines in solution for more than 3/4 Hour.

    As for warm water freezing quicker, I think that’s down to there being less oxygen in warm water than cold water. 😮

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